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sleeve or bypass? pros and cons

Discussion in 'General Surgical Weight Loss Discussion' started by IlonaJ, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. IlonaJ

    IlonaJ New Member

    Start Weight:
    17st1lb
    Current Weight:
    12st2lb
    Goal Weight:
    10st0lb
    Lost(%):
    4st13lb(28.87%)
    Surgery Type:
    bypass
    Funding Type:
    Private
    Consultant:
    Mr Ackroyd
    Surgery Date::
    1st feb 2011
    Hi all, i have my consultation tomorrow and would like to know what other people have found after their surgery for bypass and sleeve opps, both good and bad, to help me decide which is the one for me,
    pls x
     
    Rolanda likes this.
  2. Mixman

    Mixman New Member

    Start Weight:
    31st11lb
    Current Weight:
    15st0lb
    Goal Weight:
    15st0lb
    Lost(%):
    16st11lb(52.81%)
    Surgery Type:
    Sleeve Gastrectomy
    Funding Type:
    NHS
    Consultant:
    Dr Ackroyd
    Surgery Date::
    30th June 2009
    No bad, only that I could probably eat rubbish but I did dump on pineapple so steer clear of sweet things.

    I've loved this journey so far :)
     
  3. j.u.s.t.l.i.z.

    j.u.s.t.l.i.z. Runs Srh Support Group

    Surgery Type:
    had 2 bands and im now a bypass patient x
    Funding Type:
    NHS
    Consultant:
    mr small & mr balupuri, they can share me lol :-)
    Surgery Date::
    22/03/2005 & 29/08/2008 & 5/11/10
    you need to discuss your eating habbits with your team and they will help you decide which would be best for you long term, if you like sweet foods a bypass would probably be better for you x
     
  4. Mazza

    Mazza Administrator Staff Member

    Surgery Type:
    Band - sleeve revision
    Funding Type:
    NHS
    Consultant:
    Vinod Menon
    Surgery Date::
    April 09 (band) Jan 16 (band removal) 15th September 16 (sleeve)
    Ive had neither but found this comparison. Good luck! x

    Gastric Bypass

    Gastric bypass surgery involves the use of a stapling device that cuts and separates a small piece of the stomach (known as the "pouch") from the rest of the stomach. This pouch becomes the new stomach and the rest is closed off permanently. Then, depending on the procedure, the digestive tract is re-routed and the pouch is connected to one of two places: the middle portion of the small intestine (jejunum), or further down at the distal ileum. [​IMG]Both of these procedures bypass sections of the stomach and small intestine, reducing hunger, as well as absorption of nutrients and calories. This combination of effects contributes to the weight loss that occurs after surgery.
    About half of gastric bypass operations are performed through open surgery, which requires a long incision to the abdomen. The other half is performed laparoscopically. Recovery from gastric bypass surgery is long, and the procedure is irreversible.
    Weigh the benefits against the risks

    Even though gastric bypass patients lose weight faster in the first year after surgery, recent studies show that gastric bypass patients lose a greater amount of bone mass and lean muscle mass than patients who have undergone laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, requiring additional supplements to be taken by gastric bypass patients.1,2 At three years, however, the weight-loss results of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding are comparable to that of gastric bypass patients.3
    Gastric Bypass also comes with a high incidence of complications.4
    Risks with Bypass:

    • Rapid weight-loss that typically leaves excess skin and scarring
    • Stomach stretching over time, causing some to regain weight after several years
    • Portions of digestive track are bypassed, reducing absorption of essential nutrients
    • Lung problems, such as pneumonia and blood clots
    • Bowel blockage
    • Leakage of bowel contents into abdomen
    • Nausea, vomiting, temporary hair loss, food intolerances, loss of muscle mass
    • Mortality: approximately 2% of gastric bypass patients die as a result of the surgery
    • Cutting and stapling of stomach and re-routing of intestines required
    • Bleeding, blood transfusion
    • Less than desired weight-loss
    • More than desired weight-loss
    • Possible birth defects related to vitamin and mineral deficiencies of mother
    Sleeve Gastrectomy

    In some cases, patients are too obese or sickly to tolerate gastric bypass surgery and a newer procedure has been developed, called Sleeve Gastrectomy (gastric sleeve).
    Gastric sleeve is a restrictive procedure where the stomach is reduced by 60% to about the size of a banana using a large number of staples, and the larger part of the stomach is removed. The smaller stomach restricts or limits the amount of food you can eat but allows for normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. Gastric sleeve is permanent. The procedure was originally developed as a two part treatment where the patient first has gastric sleeve and once their weight reached a certain level, a second treatment such as gastric bypass was performed. In these cases, the sleeve was designed for patients with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 60 or higher.
    [​IMG]
    Risks with the Gastric Sleeve:

    • Possible staple-line leakage, which may require additional surgery to resolve
    • Possible gastric reflux and esophagitis
    • Mortality rate: <1%
    • 2.9% chance of gastric remnant dilation, suture line bleeding and leakage, and gastric strictures
    • Possible renal failure
    • Not reversible
    • Not adjustable
     
    Rolanda and dottychic like this.
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