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Horror Stories

Daisyhappy!

New Member
Hi, I have my consultation in 2 weeks and I am really excited but while doing my research I've cone across quite a few horror stories, I really don't want to frighten any of you lovely pre oppers, but by horror stories I mean a few deaths. In fairness from what I can gather, the majority were due to underlining conditions but I've just read a story of a woman who was 20 stone and her death was not blamed by the court on the surgery itself but by the fact she was deemed too overweight for it. I'm just under 19 stone so this has me terrified, am I too overweight for anesthesia?
How did all you pre oppers deal with hearing these stories?
Thanks in advance for any replies and I really am sorry for throwing a big negative spanner in the works, scare mongering really isn't my aim here.
X
 

Sambucca

New Member
I did as much research as I could pre op, reading all the positive and negative stories I could get my hands on. Its very hard not to be put off by the complications and statistics but important to keep the risk in perspective.

I believe you have a less than 1% chance of dying (stats may be different since I researched over 2 years ago), but there are complications like malabsorption, hernia, dumping that must be hard to live with.

Speaking from my own experience, I am 2 years post op, 9 stones down and living life to the full now instead of just existing as I was back then.
 

Daisyhappy!

New Member
Oh hun thanks for replying to me! I'm actually opting for the band so I know that differs slightly. I think what really frightened me was the story that a 20 stone woman died because she was overweight, I wonder am I too big a risk for the band eeek :(

In saying this, I've just got back from the chemist where I bumped into a woman I worked with years ago when I had just finished a VLCD and was a size 10/12, het eyes nearly popped out of her head when she saw me but of corse said nothing, I'm absolutely cringing now though :(
I really want this!
 

TwinkleTwinkle

A Very Happy Bunny
Oh Daisy, There are pro's & con's in all areas of surgery. Usually people are having life saving operations to treat cancer or heart problems but this op is equally life saving in a different way. My surgeon had lost 3 people over the past 10yrs out of over 3000 ops, so whilst this op is not risk free, (no op is) I was happy to take these odds. They anaesthetise people much bigger than 20 stones every day so try not to be put off by this story. Just keep your eye on the prize & you will soon be on the other side xxx :):):)
 

Big an Bouncy

New Member
She would of had some other complication as 20st is quite small for wls!I was 19st and sailed through,now 13st and very happy.We are made aware of the risks but many of us stand to die early from weight related disease.
 

Andy1968

Member
Oh Daisy, There are pro's & con's in all areas of surgery. Usually people are having life saving operations to treat cancer or heart problems but this op is equally life saving in a different way. My surgeon had lost 3 people over the past 10yrs out of over 3000 ops, so whilst this op is not risk free, (no op is) I was happy to take these odds. They anaesthetise people much bigger than 20 stones every day so try not to be put off by this story. Just keep your eye on the prize & you will soon be on the other side xxx :):):)


Excellent advice Twinkle

xx
 

yorkiegal

Baxter's mum
I was 21stone and had no complications. Before you have surgery the put you through a barrage of tests, including an exercise test to check your heart and lungs. I know of someone who was refused surgery on the actual day of it, because they had a slight concern about her heart. So frankly, they look after you and won't go ahead unless they are confident you will do well. Of course any surgery brings risks, and yes being overweight increases those risks, but the people who are doing the op are very experienced in dealing with overweight patients.

You can also do your bit to make yourself as healthy as possible for surgery. Stop smoking and start exercising. Just some faster paced walking will help your heart and lungs get stronger for example.
 

Daisyhappy!

New Member
Thanks so much everyone, excellent points made. I know the risks of me getting a weight related illness etc far outweigh the risks of something happening during surgery, just that "too overweight" thing scared the bejaysus out of me!
Yorkiegirl that's brilliant advise, you're dead right. I need to stamp out the smoking fairly soon, eeek, and the fast walking has to start!
What a truly lovely bunch you all are :)
 

kimgkg

New Member
Daisy, you are right ... they are a lovely bunch. I spoke to my consultant at my last appointment and discussed the risks ... he said the bypass had about a 1% mortality rate, and then said it was the same percentage as having your gall bladder removed. That put it in perspective for me. If I stay the same as I am, my percentage mortality rate is very much greater!!!

Do your research, girl, its one of the biggest decisions of your life ... but think of the advantages!!! :):)
 

Caren

Love my sleeve!!
in my research, the mortality rate is 0.5%
 

Haylz6

New Member
I was 37st when I had my op on the 12th July do alot bigger and I'm still here.... U just have to do all ya research, bit we are all here for support n advice, but do your research and then go from there hunnie xx

Sent from my iPhone using WLSurgery
 

Peterborough Guy

Luton and Dunstable
I was almost 24 stone when I had mine done, and here I am today 19.5 stone, and happy to of had it done, like others have said, there are risks to all surgeries, but the way I looked at it rightly or wrongly, is that if I did pass away, I wouldn't know about it, and if I didn't I will have a new life for me and my family :)

I had no worries and only one regret and that's why didn't I get it done sooner.
 

happy days

New Member
I really panicked the day before surgery about getting out of the theatre and what if I die I wud never see my family again, never see the kids grow up. I spoke to the anasetist that nite and he said do you really think I wud knowingly put you under if I thought you were at risk and apart from that your not messing my stats up lol.
Best advice was just hearing him say that x
 

Louise1

New Member
My consultant is totally open and at his initial seminar tells you that he's had 2 deaths.
Both were due to underlying complications.
In my one to one when he gave me my surgery date, he assessed my personal risk of mortality which is the lowest for this type of surgery.
I know it's hard not to get a little frightened but like others have said, they wouldn't operate unless they thought they could help you. It's in no doctors interest to lose patients.
Think of the goal and the extended life & increase in quality of life. It soon weighs up for most of us.
Good luck & I hope your team reassure you!!
xx
 

Ric

Wants to run a marathon
I,m 24 stone and I lived yay!!!

I was told by my cosultant I had less and 1 in a hundred chance of anything going wrong.

There are risks, the risks. We're worth it for me, didn't stop me worrying excessively about them though, wish I didn't :p
 

TurtleGal

New Member
I've been having the same sort of thing. That's the bad part of being obsessive like I am with the research, I'm finding tons of horror stories and fear mongers that are scaring the crap out of me...
 

Josiegirl

New Member
These days weight loss surgery is much safer. It is extremely rare for someone to die due to anaesthetic. The dangers are more from things like blood clots but these days people are given long courses of claxaine injections to prevent them along with compression stockings which should be worn until your mobility is back to normal again.

I had my op on my 62nd birthday and besides being very overweight for my height I have blocked arteries in my legs, angina, diabetes, arthritis and lots of other co morbidities. I have had weight loss surgery twice and both times I came through with no problems at all.

To put the risks into perspective I told my doctor how much the surgery cost, after she asked, and she replied, " That is a small price to pay for adding 25 years to your life."
 
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